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HomeFact Check'Artificial Woman' Made In China? No, Video Viral With False Claim

‘Artificial Woman’ Made In China? No, Video Viral With False Claim

A video showing what appears to be an interaction between a humanoid robot and a person is being widely shared on social media platforms. Those who shared the video claim it shows an “artificial woman made in China,” launched in the Chinese markets who “works for  72 hours without interruption on a single charge.”  Social media users further claim that she has been developed by using “100% Fanta flesh material silicone spare parts” and does not require food. Newschecker found the claim to be untrue.

Several Facebook users shared the video of an alleged China-made artificial woman, identified as Hoori/Howri, claiming that it will be soon launched in India “to target the youths.”

Links to such Facebook posts can be found here, here, here and here.

The video is being widely shared on Twitter as well.

Archived versions of such tweets can be seen here, here, here and here.

Also Read: Yet Again! Gaming Footage Passed Off As Russia’s Attack On Ukraine

Fact Check/Verification

On analysing the video, we heard the alleged artificial woman featured in the clip saying, “I am Chloe…. I am the first personal assistant built by cyberlife..” Taking a clue, we conducted a keyword search for “Chloe, “personal assistant” & “cyberlife” on Google which led us to a blog titled ‘How Chloe Became Human,’ published on the official website of Quantic Dream, a video game company.

The blog post elaborated on the character development of Chloe for Detroit: Become Human, a video game developed by Quantic Dream. Featuring an image of the alleged China-made “artificial woman,” the article stated, “According to Detroit: Become Human’s lore, the first RT600 android ‘Chloe’ was built in 2021 by Elijah Kamski… In the game’s universe, what makes Chloe special might be the fact that she is the first one you meet…”

Screengrab from Quantic Dream website

It further carried a YouTube video, dated July 22, 2021, titled ‘Detroit: Become Human – Shorts: Chloe | [Archives] 2/4.’ Around 8 seconds into the video, we spotted the widely circulated footage claiming to show the artificial woman developed by China.

(L-R) Screengrab from YouTube video by Quantic Dream and screengrab from viral video

Notably, text saying “the following takes place before the story of the game” can be seen in the initial frames of the YouTube video.

Artificial Woman Made In China
Screengrab from YouTube video by Quantic Dream

The same video was uploaded on the official YouTube channel of PlayStation on May 23, 2018.

Further, we looked up “Chloe,” & “Detroit: Become Human” on YouTube which yielded several videos uploaded on channels dedicated to video gaming. One such video by RajmanGaming HD, dated May 25, 2018, featured footage of several characters from the game Detroit: Become Human, including the viral footage.

Additionally, the character ‘Chloe’ was also introduced to the public via the  Twitter handle of Detroit: Become Human in May 2018. The same tweet can be seen below.

We could thus conclude that a video showing a character from a game is being passed off as visuals of an “artificial woman made in China.”

Old Claim Resurfaces

A longer version of the gaming footage had gone viral in February this year falsely claiming to show the first plastic female human developed by China.

The similar video was being widely circulated in 2019 claiming to show a “human robot unveiled by Japan.”

Conclusion

Viral post claiming to show an “artificial woman” developed by China is false. The video is actually a gaming footage.

Result: False

Sources

Official Website Of Quantic Dream
YouTube Video By PlayStation, Dated May 23, 2018


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Vasudha Beri
Vasudha Beri
Vasudha noticed the growing problem of mis/disinformation online after studying New Media at ACJ in Chennai and became interested in separating facts from fiction. She is interested in learning how global issues affect individuals on a micro level. Before joining Newschecker’s English team, she was working with Latestly.
Vasudha Beri
Vasudha Beri
Vasudha noticed the growing problem of mis/disinformation online after studying New Media at ACJ in Chennai and became interested in separating facts from fiction. She is interested in learning how global issues affect individuals on a micro level. Before joining Newschecker’s English team, she was working with Latestly.

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