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HomeFact CheckOld Photo From Northern Ireland Falsely Linked To Baltimore Bridge Collapse

Old Photo From Northern Ireland Falsely Linked To Baltimore Bridge Collapse

Authors

Vasudha noticed the growing problem of mis/disinformation online after studying New Media at ACJ in Chennai and became interested in separating facts from fiction. She is interested in learning how global issues affect individuals on a micro level. Before joining Newschecker’s English team, she was working with Latestly.

Claim
Car submerged in water following the collapse of Baltimore bridge.

Fact
2022 photograph of a mishap in Northern Ireland. 

At least two people died, and four were presumed dead after the Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed on Tuesday morning. A cargo ship crashed into the bridge causing it to crumble, and plunging multiple vehicles into the water below. In this backdrop, multiple social media users shared a photograph of a car submerged in water claiming that it shows the aftermath of Baltimore bridge collapse. Newschecker found that the image is old, and unrelated to the recent mishap in the US.

Multiple X users shared the photograph of a submerged car, along with the visuals of the Baltimore bridge collapse.

Archived versions of such posts can be seen here, here, here, here, here and here.

Also Read: 2022 Video Of Kerch Bridge Explosion Falsely Linked To Baltimore Bridge Collapse

Fact Check/Verification

A Google lens search on the viral image led us to a report by BBC, dated January 1, 2022, titled ‘Dungiven: Man escapes after car crashes into river.’ Displaying the viral photo, the report elaborated, “A man has been taken to hospital after his car entered the River Roe near Dungiven, County Londonderry, on New Year’s Day. The Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service said it used ropes to help him up an embankment off Magheramore Road just after 09:00 GMT.He had been able to get out of the car himself.”

Screengrabs from BBC website

The BBC report had credited the viral photograph of a car submerged in a river to NIFRS West – Northern Ireland Fire & Rescue Service, Western Area Command.

Not Related To Baltimore Bridge Collapse
Screengrab from BBC website

Also Read: Deepfake Video Of Donald Trump Promising Support To Ex-Pak PM Imran Khan Goes Viral Ahead Of US Polls

Following this, we looked up keywords “NIFRS West,” “Dungiven,” “River,” and “car” on Google which yielded a report by Belfast Telegraph, dated January 1, 2022. It featured the viral image with the caption, “The scene where a car entered the water outside Dungiven (Picture by NIFRS)”

The report quoted a police spokesperson as saying, “Police received a report of a road traffic collision which occurred at the Magheramore Road area of Dungiven on Saturday 1st January. At around 9:05am, it was reported that a car had struck a bridge in the area and entered the river. One man was taken to hospital following the incident.”

We found that the viral photograph was also shared on the official Facebook page of the NIFRS West on January 1, 2022, with the caption, “Fire crews from Dungiven & Limavady, supported by specialist crews from Crescent Link & Central Fire Stations responded to a vehicle in water incident this morning on the outskirts of Dungiven. The vehicle driver was rescued by the first attending crews and a subsequent systemic river search was undertaken until the PSNI confirmed that all vehicle occupants had been accounted for.”

Screengrab from Facebook post by NIFRS West

Also Read: GST On Good Morning Messages? No, Clipped Video Report Shared With False Claim

Conclusion

We could thus conclude that over two-year-old-photo of an accident in Northern Ireland has been falsely linked to the recent Baltimore bridge mishap in the US.

Result: False

Sources
Report By BBC, Dated January 1, 2022
Report By Belfast Telegraph, Dated January 1, 2022
Facebook Post By @nifrswestern, Dated January 1, 2022


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Authors

Vasudha noticed the growing problem of mis/disinformation online after studying New Media at ACJ in Chennai and became interested in separating facts from fiction. She is interested in learning how global issues affect individuals on a micro level. Before joining Newschecker’s English team, she was working with Latestly.

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